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Kelburn – ancient castle of the 13th century, covered with colorful graffiti

Kelburn – ancient castle of the 13th century, covered with colorful graffiti

Who said the castles should be gloomy stone buildings with a gray or brown exterior? Count Glasgow is another opinion on this matter, so he turned his castle to a real work of street art.

Kelburn – ancient castle of the 13th century, covered with colorful graffiti

Kelburn Castle near Fairley, 35 miles west of Glasgow, in Scotland, belongs to the Boyl family from the moment of construction in the 13th century. This castle is considered the oldest in Scotland constantly owned by the same family.

Kelburn – the old castle of the 13th century, covered with graffiti Kelburn – the old castle of the 13th century

In 1703, the Parliament of Scotland created the title of "Graph Glasgow" for the then owner of David Boyl castle. David was one of the authorized representatives leading negotiations on an alliance agreement, uniting England and Scotland to the UK. From those major Celberne castle was a house for all kind of boils until today’s time.

Kelburn – Castle of the 13th century, covered with colorful graffiti Kelburn – Vintage castle covered with colorful graffiti

In 2007, the 10th and current graph of Glasgow Patrick Robin Archibald Boyle decided that he needed to remove the external cement plaster from the castle, which did not change since the 1950s and demanded a replacement.

Celberne Castle, near Farley Celberne Castle, close to Fairli, Scotland

At the suggestion of their children, Patrick Boyle agreed that before all the plaster was removed, street artists will be painted. The Son of the Count invited a group of four Brazilian street artists to decorate the tower and the castle walls with their unique graffiti.

Kelburn Castle, near Farley in Scotland Celberne Castle, Scotland

Kelburn - ancient castle of the 13th century, covered with colorful graffiti

The work of Brazilian artists has gained great attention to the media, attracting many tourists from all over the world. The government organization for the preservation of antiquities agreed to the project, provided that graffiti is temporary.

Kelburn Castle in Scotland

All graffiti needed to be removed in three years, but seeing the response of the public, the graph appealed to the organization to make the work permanent. The Agency has resolved some freedom of action that allows the artistic work for a few more years.

Celberne Castle with Graffiti

In 2012, the agency conducted an inspection of the castle and found that the cement seriously damaged the wall of the castle, and a graph called to remove graffiti. Clear walls from the drawings was needed by the summer of 2015, but this did not happen.

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